2018 ISMTA Conference Schedule

 

Friday, October 26

7:30am-5:00pm Registration in entrance hall of the Music Building
8:00am-5:00pm MTNA Competitions
9:00am-5:00pm Exhibits in entrance hall of the Music Building
8:00am-9:00am Board Meeting – Concert Hall
9:00-9:45am Advisory Council Meeting – Concert Hall
10:00-10:30am General Meeting- Concert Hall
10:45-11:45am Pedagogy Session with Sylvia Wang – Concert Hall
12:00-12:25pm Forums – AIM/Local Presidents – Rooms 171, 173
12:30-2:00pm Lunch - Duke Ellington Ballroom @ Holmes
2:00-2:25pm Forums – Rooms 171, 173
2:30-3:20pm Session 1 – Rooms 171, 173
3:30-4:20pm Session 2 – Rooms 171, 173
4:30-5:20 Session 3 – Rooms 171, 173
5:30-6:30 Cocktail Hour – Duke Ellington Ballroom @ Holmes
6:30-8:00pm Dinner – Duke Ellington Ballroom @ Holmes
8:00pm Recital: Sylvia Wang – Sandberg Hall @ Holmes

Saturday, October 27

7:30am-5:00pm Registration in entrance hall of the Music Building
8:00am-5:00pm MTNA Competitions
9:00am-5:00pm Exhibits in entrance hall of the Music Building
9:00-9:50am   Session 4 – Rooms 171, 173
10:00-11:30am Masterclass with Sylvia Wang - Concert Hall
11:30-12:30 NIU Faculty Recital - Concert Hall
12:30-2:00pm Lunch - Duke Ellington Ballroom @ Holmes
2:00-2:25pm Forums – Rooms 171, 173
2:30-3:20pm Session 5 – Concert Hall, Room 173
3:30-4:20pm Session 6 – Rooms 171, 173
4:30-5:20pm Session 7 – Rooms 171, 173
5:30pm Competitions Recital – Concert Hall

ISMTA 2018 SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

(Session 1)  Friday, October 26, 2:30-3:20 pm
The Bastien Family: A Tribute to Jane and Jim Bastien
Lisa Bastien
173-Lecture Hall

Jim and Jane Bastien made differences in countless lives with their composing, teaching, writing, and performing. With more than 500 publications to their credit - some translated into 16 languages - they revolutionized the way piano is taught. As a tribute to them and the countless students they inspired, step back in time to hear how this remarkable couple met and began their storied careers as innovative piano pedagogues, and how that tradition lives on through their daughters, Lisa and Lori. Lisa will share anecdotes and insights that will make you laugh, cry, ponder, and understand the Bastien family “passion for teaching.” You will be inspired to carry on this legacy in your own musical and life journeys.

(Session 1)  Friday, October 26, 2:30-3:20 pm
Messages from the New World: Piano Sonatas by American Composers
Matthew Hagle
171-Choral Room

The piano sonatas of Charles Griffes, Aaron Copland and Elliot Carter are emblematic of some important trends in American piano music. These sonatas, which are important works in a somewhat neglected tradition, are worth rediscovering as we consider our place as American musicians within a European art form, and how that art form has evolved over the past century and will continue to evolve. This session will feature performance of movements from the sonatas, as well as analysis and performance suggestions.

 

(Session 2)  Friday, October 26, 3:30-4:20 pm   
AIM Session
Nancy Liley
173-Lecture Hall

(Session 2)  Friday, October 26, 3:30-4:20 pm   
How to care for the tools of our trade: Our Hands, Arms and Shoulders
Eric W. Sutz
171-Choral Room

Our arms are our tools through which we interact as teachers and musicians, but sadly, they are too often taken for granted. Overuse, underuse, misuse plus lack of mobility leads to stiffness, limited ROM, adhesions, poor circulation and injuries. This presentation will teach you how to perform your own self care. You will learn how we build up dysfunction in our shoulder joints, elbows and arms, and how to begin the ungluing process for regaining healthy biomechanical function. It is vitally important to understand the steps to regain the use of your tools! No special clothing or props needed for this presentation.

 

(Session 3)  Friday, October 26, 4:30-5:20 pm  
Decoding the Bach Inventions
Dr. Svetlana Belsky
173-Lecture Hall

While we teachers often treat the Inventions as mere finger exercises, they are much more than that. Bach wrote them for his own sons to teach, yes, finger independence, but, above all, compositional and contrapuntal techniques. Each one is a little gem, with surprises, puzzles and jokes just waiting to be discovered. This program will analyze several works, concentrating on those sadly neglected.

(Session 3)  Friday, October 26, 4:30-5:20 pm
Timbre, Touch, Tuning and Me! (You)
Jeff Cappelli
171-Choral Room

Jeff Cappelli will help you to discover the potential of tone color, the overall sensations of touch, control and dynamic balance from pp to ff available at the piano under your fingers. He will discuss reasonable expectations for proper tuning, regulation and voicing, help you to know how to determine the overall condition and potential of your own piano and those pianos with which you perform, teach or play regularly.

 

(Session 4)  Saturday, October 27, 9:00-9:50 am     
How to Make 30 Minutes Feel Like a Ton of Time
Dr. Jeff Kleinsorge
173-Lecture Hall

Does jamming the AIM requirements for Levels 1A through 3 into a 30-minute lesson make it feel more like 30 seconds? With creative forethought, you can teach more in less time, without feeling rushed … and you can do it musically. In this session, you’ll learn about a multitasked teaching strategy stemming from the notion that music is more like a Spirograph than a scaffold. Although you can (and should) view and teach musical elements in isolation, those elements are interrelated. Why not, for example, layer geography, aural skills, harmonization, and transposition into a lesson that is ostensibly about technique?

(Session 4)  Saturday, October 27, 9:00-9:50 am     
Anniversary composers Lili Boulanger and Frederic Mompou: Some Piano pieces to Play and Teach
Dr. Janice Larson Razaq
171-Choral Room

This 2018 composer anniversary lecture/demonstration features the performance and teaching of piano pieces with relatively simple technical demands, but sophisticated musical challenges. This is something every good teacher deals with. Stimulating the musical imagination, teaching how to produce various tone colors and a wide variety of controlled dynamics can be exciting and inspiring for a pianist of any age. This session explores some works of the composers Lili Boulanger 1893-1918, France) and Frederic Mompou (1893-1987, Spain). A total of thirteen short pieces will be performed and discussed for their teaching potential.

 

(Session 5)  Saturday, October 27, 2:30-3:20 pm
The Fortepiano – Demonstration or Teacher?
Kenneth Drake and Jun-Hee Han
Concert Hall

A fortepiano cannot tell us what Mozart actually heard any more than an early automobile can recreate the experience of a passenger in 1910. Mozart never heard the modern piano, while we hear his piano through the sound of our piano. The clarity of the fortepiano nevertheless teaches concentration on an expressiveness that is easily lost in the sonority of the modern piano. With a

fortepiano and a modern grand piano side by side, transferring interpretation and technique to the modern piano in sound (exploiting dynamic range), touch and articulation, and tempo and rhetorical pacing will be illustrated.

(Session 5)  Saturday, October 27, 2:30-3:20 pm
Migraine-Free Management — Operating an Independent Studio with Less Stress!
Clinton Pratt
173-Lecture Hall

“There’s a soccer game, can I reschedule?”… “Oops, my books are at Grandma’s.”… “Can I bring tuition next week?”… “Whaaaat?! There’s a recital?”… Sound familiar? Come learn the cure for many common studio headaches. With my experience teaching in several music academies and running my own successful studio for over 15 years, I have refined and reorganized my policies and procedures to the point where I rarely deal with these common problems anymore. These topics are universal and pervasive with both seasoned and novice independent music teachers, so there will be plenty of time for open discussion and questions.

 

(Session 6)  Saturday, October 27, 3:30-4:20 pm   
A Creative and Comprehensive Approach to Sight-reading
Dr. Cole Burger
173-Lecture Hall

In his book The Practice Revolution, Phillip Johnston astutely mentions that poor sightreading is often a reason students don’t practice. Let’s get our students practicing more by building this important skill! After an examination of the scholarly research, this presentation will describe ways to incorporate sight-reading, suggest a step-by-step progression of materials to use, and recommend approaches for developing students’ skills, including ideas for before, during, and after any example. Closing the gap between piano students’ performance and sight-reading abilities is the surest way to develop lifetime learners and music lovers.

(Session 6)  Saturday, October 27, 3:30-4:20 pm   
The Intermediate Piano Student: Appealing Repertoire, New Performance Options, and Opportunities for Teacher Training.
Dr. Marcia Bosits
171-Choral Room

The intermediate years are challenging for many piano students. Limited practice time, longer periods for repertoire acquisition, and the “sameness” of recital performances cause some students to abandon lessons. How can we reignite their enthusiasm for piano study? Featured will be new pieces that are current, accessible, pianistic, and appealing. Also included will be practical ways to include sight reading and literacy in lessons without sacrificing repertoire.

Finally, offering alternative performance options encourages participation and broadens experience for the maturing student. This session will explore activities, approaches, and rationale developed over years of teaching intermediate students and training young teachers.

 

(Session 7)  Saturday, October 27, 4:30-5:20 pm
Schubert: Man of Melody and Mystery
Janna Williamson
173-Lecture Hall

Reflecting upon the well loved, yet often mysterious and sometimes misunderstood Franz Schubert and his piano compositions, Janna Williamson will explore questions of meaning in the composer's music and how known biographical information and historical context can inform our understanding and performance. Included will be an overview of pieces appropriate for pre college teaching found on the AIM Syllabus, incorporating technical tips and practice suggestions. The presenter will perform one of the Impromptus from Op.142/D.935 as part of the session.

(Session 7)  Saturday, October 27, 4:30-5:20 pm
A No-Tears Guide to Accompanying Art Song plus What Pianists Should Know About Collaboration with Instrumentalists
Dr. Joseph D. Welch
171-Choral Room

Classical art song is some of the most interesting, fun, and rewarding repertoire for the pianist. Preparing the score takes imagination, storytelling skills, creativity, and the most expressively nuanced technique. The process is both enthralling for the performer and an effective pedagogical tool. Using Moritz Moszkowski’s song cycle Thränen, we will explore the specific challenges and thrills of vocal accompanying. After demonstrating several concepts, the session will include a complete performance of the song cycle. Unique tips for instrumental collaboration will also be discussed.